GDAMS 2015 Final report is out !

Here is the Global Day of Action on Military Spending’s final report, highlighting the main actions that took place all over the world. Our partners organised 127 events in 20 countries including various campaigns on social media, a kite-flying event, a street meditation, a night light action, a blockade of military establishments, writing a poem, a video clip and others. This year’s Day of Action came at a time of increasing tensions in several regions, and signs of political pressure to spend more from the public purse on the military and to sell yet more weapons. At the same time governments and the UN are urging greater financial commitments both to the Post-2015 Development Agenda, and to efforts to tackle the climate change crisis. The Day of Action was an opportunity to take stock of the facts and to explore what can be done at various levels.

This report is interactive : kindly click on the names of our partners to visit their websites, on the pictures to see more photos, and on the videos to watch them.

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Click here to download the PDF version of the report.

EU cannot give military responses to political problems

By Sabine Lösing

Three key reports have moved through parliament’s security and defence subcommittee which represent an alarming approach to problems facing the European Union.

First, there is the implementation of the common security and defence policy (CSDP) report by Arnaud Danjean. This report, along with other key debates in parliament, takes the form of a ‘military wish list’ ahead of this June’s council meeting.

These reports demand enhanced armament cooperation, including the pooling and sharing of resources. This approach fosters the further development of a military industrial complex and supports the merging of civilian and military research in order to use civilian capabilities for military purposes. Continue reading–>

Salon Writer: ‘National Security’ Means Less Money For Military, More For Education and Health Care

By Tom Johnson

In the early 1990s, politicians floated the term “peace dividend” regarding a hoped-for post-Cold War reduction in the U.S. defense budget, and Pentagon spending indeed fell somewhat in the mid- and late ‘90s. Sean McElwee, a research associate at the lefty think tank Demos, argues that America now needs a post-9/11, post-Afghanistan, post-Iraq peace dividend which would allow greatly increased spending on certain domestic programs. Continue reading–>