Archive for November, 2010

November 2010 Newsletter

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Last year, the world spent $1.53 trillion dollars on the military. That is an almost inconceivable number. To put this number in perspective, the World Food Summit estimates that $30 billion a year could eradicate world hunger. That’s what the world spends on the military in a single week. We can’t afford this price tag. We have too many other priorities that require our money: poverty, climate change, job creation. It’s time for people all over the world to come together and say no to the generals and the military contractors.

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Fact Sheet: Military Spending vs. Millennium Development Goals

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The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures. The following graphs demonstrate the extent to which military spending eclipses all other global priorities. The estimated cost of compliance with all eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals are eclipsed by yearly military spending figures.

Video: What Is $1.6 Trillion Worth?

At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close. At the expense of pressing global priorities in health, hunger, and education, the world spent about $1.6 trillion on the military in 2010. In order to appreciate just how big that number is, we added up what it would cost to address several other global problems — and didn’t even come close.

Video: Cultures of Resistance: A Look at Global Militarization

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In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.” In 2009, the United States government spent some $650 billion on its military. This is more than the next 46 highest-spending countries combined. Much of this treasure ended up in the hands of profit-driven weapons manufacturers. In the following short film, Cultures of Resistance takes a brief look at the current state of what President Eisenhower famously called the “military industrial complex.”